Hello! :)
rennington:

bad haircut and more shades of blue in one outfit than should be legal 

rennington:

bad haircut and more shades of blue in one outfit than should be legal 

acciosomething:

ASL resources

rated-d:

Thanks wanderingpuck

That’s quite helpful!

shannon-freeman:

In Irish folklore, mermaids (called “merrows”) collect the souls of those drowned at sea. I’m not sure if that’s a child-appropriate story, but this cutesy picture was lots of fun to draw!

shannon-freeman:

In Irish folklore, mermaids (called “merrows”) collect the souls of those drowned at sea. I’m not sure if that’s a child-appropriate story, but this cutesy picture was lots of fun to draw!

Tiny animation I made for my dad’s birthday. Happy Birthday Dad!

Tiny animation I made for my dad’s birthday. Happy Birthday Dad!

toastyhat:

speikobrarote replied to your post: Also, A Light Em Up Preview

I want the Eridan Dualscar one as a Background for my desktop ;__;

Gotcha covered. uvu

toastyhat:

speikobrarote replied to your post: Also, A Light Em Up Preview

I want the Eridan Dualscar one as a Background for my desktop ;__;

Gotcha covered. uvu

roachpatrol:

gearfish:

This morning my friend texted me and told me it’s Draw a Centaur Day  so I doodled a couple in between class stuff
(Centaurs aren’t as cool as dragons but they’re okay)

adorable

roachpatrol:

gearfish:

This morning my friend texted me and told me it’s Draw a Centaur Day  so I doodled a couple in between class stuff

(Centaurs aren’t as cool as dragons but they’re okay)

adorable

missnouveau:

vythefirst:

hazeldrop:

There is a myth that every photo taken of someone contains a piece of their soul. These pictures are an eternal impression; a shadow; an existence; a life. But when someone is nearing death, who is responsible for acquiring the final piece? 

Now for something a little different! This is a two page comic project for school about superstitions. Overall I am happy with the results for the comic but the process was very tedious ;_; Anyway, I hope you enjoy! 

This is so so so beautiful; I absolutely love the colors and the line work is incredible! It’s also a little morbid, but I like the eerie tone the pages give off. -v- verrryyy loveeellyyyyy <3

Oh this is eerie and lovely. The layout is so NICE! And them colors…

rockaroni:


pumble those imps and collect their grist!!!

rockaroni:

pumble those imps and collect their grist!!!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

Do you have any writing tips for OCs? It's an area which can be very tricky, but all of yours are pretty well written.
Anonymous

temporaldecay:

Sure! Writing OCs is tricky, but like everything, you get better at it with practice. Here’s some lessons I’ve learned along the way, I hope it helps:

  • The C in OC stands for CHARACTER.

OCs are characters. This seems a bit redundant, but it’s important to keep it in mind. You’re writing characters. Characters, when you get down to it, are tools you are using to create an emotional response in your reader. Characters, by definition, do things. So don’t be afraid of letting your OC do stuff. One of the reasons I think a lot of people dislike OCs is that they’re false advertisement. The story TELLS you they are A, B and C, but when pushing comes to shoving, they never do anything resembling A, B or C. In fact, the most hated OCs are the ones that never actually DO anything. Do you want your OCs to be loved, in story? Make them earn that. Do you want them to be hated? By gods, let them DO something to cause that reaction. Characters who don’t do anything aren’t characters, they’re props. Props don’t even deserve names, so either get your characters doing something, or just incorporate them into the scenery and call it a day.

  • Every character is the Main Character of their own Personal Story. (It just might be that you’re telling a different story.)

One of the things that people get told, constantly, about OCs, is that they shouldn’t be the focus of the story. This… isn’t exactly true. It depends on what type of story you’re telling. When you create a character and start building on them, giving them flaws and a history and trying to articulate them into their own person, it’s pretty natural to get carried away with it. After all, you’ll reach that blessed EUREKA moment where they make sense and you can shuffle them around like you would a canon character without any issue, and then you’ll want people to get them, too, so you want to pack in details and comments that explain them. Don’t, unless the story calls for it. Don’t, unless your readers NEED that knowledge, for something other than patting you in the back because you didn’t write a Mary Sue. Everything you put in a story has to have a reason for being there, narratively speaking, otherwise it’s just padding and boring and getting in the way of the story you want to tell. Your readers won’t care about your OCs tragic backstory, if you start telling it in the middle of a climactic space battle. But they might, if the character is bonding with someone else and giving insight that their circumstances has taught them. You should definitely flesh out your character with as many details as you can possibly think of, more so than if they were the Main Character of the story you’re telling, but when it comes to putting that down into the story you need to be hyper critical about what makes the cut, or your pacing will suffer hell for it.

  • No one is the very best - or worst - that ever was.

This is more an observation about larger casts than anything else. No one is THE best at something. And no one is THE worst at anything. Making characters into superlatives is one of the objectively worst things you could do, as a writer. First of all, because congratulations, you just wrote yourself into a corner involving research until YOU are the closest you can be to the VERY BEST at [X]. (This corner never ends because research never ends BECAUSE NO ONE IS THE VERY BEST AT ANYTHING, IRL.) Second of all, congratulations, you just doomed your character to be stupid. I’m not even kidding. The moment you make a character into one of the big superlatives, you just tied your own hands, because your plot will, most likely, end up hinging on them not being at their full capacity as VERY BEST AT SOMETHING at some point. (Remember how LotR people get pestered about the eagles? Yeah, that’s gonna be you. You’re gonna fucking hate the fucking eagles by the time you’re done, trust me.) LASTLY, and perhaps more dangerously, you just made your character objectively boring in a leading role. Your character can no longer take the spotlight - canon or OC, it doesn’t matter at this point - because there is no tension to be had. They’re The Very Best, of course they’re gonna win. Of course they’re going to triumph over the obstacles, because the obstacles aren’t really there anyway. This is why any “omnicient” character in any media you’ve ever consumed is either a slacker or a trickster or a bored deity that chooses to play by the rules. Because once they’re in the superlative category, there’s just no plot to be had unless you artificially make one, and trust me, it’ll be obvious you’re doing so. Any character in the superlative category overstays their welcome if they’re pulled into the forefront, because they just… shrug off everything. Or because you need to overcompensate with some flaw that ends up being really, really obnoxious by end game.

Let your characters be average John Does. Let them have mundane lives and mundane powers and mundane experiences. Despite what you might think, the mundane is often far more astounding and entertaining, in fiction, than the exotic. Because people can connect with the mundane, can form empathy bonds to character and identify themselves with their experiences if they’re mundane, in spirit at least, than with the larger than life types that only work from a distance. This goes for OCs and canon characters, too: LET THEM BE AWARE THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO ARE BETTER THAN THEM IN A, B OR C. IT’S OKAY.

Let me give you a very visceral example about this last point: Why do the Imoogi exist in Distrait? To justify the general coherence of the Empire, despite the swift and often chaotic change in Empresses, who may I remind you, ARE ALL CHILDREN WHEN THEY ASCEND TO THE THRONE. Children don’t know how to govern an Empire. There had to be someone there to help them get the hang of it, but who would also not take power for themselves and make them into puppet rulers or something like that. So the Imoogi it is. Why is Garfit the Imoogi in turn, when Feferi and company take over the Empire in Distrait? Because Feferi and company are children. They’re talented and smart and resourceful children, yes, but they’re children anyway. They don’t know anything about the politics of the greater Empire. They don’t know anything about ACTUALLY fighting wars and controlling a population the size of a galaxy. They don’t understand highblood power games and lowblood resentment and a thousand things that they have never encountered before in their lives, but which will become very real, the moment they take on the reigns of the Empire. To put it bluntly, they’re painfully ill-fitted to rule an Empire like theirs, and there’s gotta be someone, somewhere, to keep things in place until they get their shit together enough to learn. This doesn’t mean there’s anything inherently wrong or lacking with them, or that they don’t deserve their positions in the Empire. It just means that it was childish of Feferi to put her friends at the head of the Empire, instead of people who actually knew what the fuck they were doing. But it was the kind of childish thing that a desperate young girl with a limited power base would do, because they are the only people Feferi actually trusts. And while she eventually learns her way around the Empire and who she can trust and who she can’t turn her back to, you gotta ask yourself, what happened to the Empire in the meantime. Who kept shit under wraps while she and her circle figured out how this ruling thing goes? It’s a massive Empire. If there hadn’t been anyone keeping people in line for her - without her knowledge even - Feferi would have been overthrown and so would have been her friends. So that’s Garfit’s role in the story, and that’s why they’re so strong and powerful and old, because they need to be wise and ruthless and devastating to hold the fort while Feferi learns to handle it on her own. And that’s also why you don’t see much of Garfit, because people - the focus people we follow around - aren’t really aware of them and their influence. Garfit is one of the most important characters in-universe in Distrait, because there literally wouldn’t be a Distrait-verse without them, but as important as they are, it doesn’t mean the story is about Garfit or that they have any business in the foreground, usually.

Bottomline, make sure your characters have a point. Whether it is to justify or hold together your worldbuilding, or to evoke a reaction from people - love or hate - make sure you have a reason for those characters being included. And then stick to that reason and the rules you’ve build for your universe. Everything else will just fall into place eventually.

I’ve rambled more about writing tips here, here, here, here, here, here and here.

revolutionator:

reinardfox:

who are these nerds

Oh

waltzforluma:

"Dance of Swords" from Steven the Swordfighter.

Dance of Swords. Sword of Dances. This is the background music for the duel between Pearl and Holo Pearl!

Music: Aivi & Surasshu
Art: Joe Johnston

tlsdlrhdwh:

idk
마감하기실타

tlsdlrhdwh:

idk

마감하기실타

toastyhat:

HELLGOD GIRL WILL HAVE YOUR SOULS
I deeply enjoy animating morphing grimdark Rose.

toastyhat:

HELLGOD GIRL WILL HAVE YOUR SOULS

I deeply enjoy animating morphing grimdark Rose.